Sunday, March 21, 2010

A clear word on Sunday morning in the midst of Lent. . .

Isaiah 10:1-4. . .

Woe to those who make unjust laws, to those who issue oppressive decrees, to deprive the poor of their rights and withhold justice from the oppressed of my people, making widows their prey and robbing the fatherless.

What will you do on the day of reckoning, when disaster comes from afar? To whom will you run for help? Where will you leave your riches? Nothing will remain but to cringe among the captives or fall among the slain. Yet for all this, his anger is not turned away, his hand is still upraised.

3 comments:

Cody said...

How does one argue with that? I assume someone will...

Anonymous said...

The true believer has learned to look away from the killing ordinances of the old law. He understands that “as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse, for it is written: Cursed is everyone that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them.” He therefore turns with loathing from all trust in his own obedience to the ten commands, and lays hold with joy upon the hope set before him in the one commandment contained in my text, “This is his commandment, that we should believe on the name of his Son Jesus Christ.” We sing, and sing rightly too —

“My soul, no more attempt to draw
Thy life and comfort from the law,”

for from the law death cometh and not life, misery and not comfort. “To convince and to condemn is all the law can do.” O, when will all professors, and especially all professed ministers of Christ, learn the difference between the law and the gospel?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous, it sounds as if you are trying to offer a Calvinistic dispensationalism. Lots of us are neither Calvinists nor dispensationalists, so that wouldn't speak very forcefully to us.

Jeff W