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Friday, February 22, 2013

Take a moment to read this. . .

You will not waste your time if you stop to read this very important post by Rev. Gerald Britt!

After you read, let me know your reaction!

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

The lives of our founding fathers are given short shift in our public schools these days. They are too busy studying how unjust they were from Howard Zinn textbooks. Even college students are quite ignorant of our founding fathers. Public schools are indoctrination centers for liberal dogma.

Anonymous said...

Why is the left so fixated on race? This is the 21st century, we have a black president. I'm sorry life was hard for them at the turn of the 20th century. It was not exactly comfortable for my ancestors either. Get over it people. Get some real heroes like Bel Carson and less rappers and athletes.

Anonymous said...

That's Ben Carson

Anonymous said...

I read the article and yawned. Britt certainly does his part to keep racism alive.

Anonymous said...

Thanks, Larry, for the link to Rev. Britt's post. It was thoughtful and challenging, reminding us of heroes who have been overlooked, men and women who have contributed to our common history. It does not "keep racism alive" to tell those stories. What does contribute to racism is leaving those stories untold. It seems to me that Rev. Britt's point was to find that common humanity that will bring us together - not separate us. "We have - in spite our particulars and differences - a common humanity that should lead to a common understanding. And we shouldn't have to change or ignore our histories, no matter how painful, in order to discover and even celebrate that common humanity." Thanks for the reminder that the stories of W.E.B DuBois are a part of the American story.
Ann

Anonymous said...

2/22 Anons - It must be scary not to have a monopoly on American history any more. To have others heard. To have our Founding Fathers, brilliant as they were in some respects, nonetheless become the real, flawed people they actually were without mythologizing. And how awful to be reminded that your ancestors may have actually enslaved people, then treated them like serfs for a century even after slavery ended. I think you're the ones that need to "get over it." Your monopoly on the conversation is gone, and it ain't coming back.

Anonymous said...

Larry, I read the post by Rev Britt and found it interesting, but I want to offer you a challenge. Have the real courage to respond to Ben Carson?

RC

Larry James said...

RC, I heard Dr. Carson's speech at the National Prayer Breakfast, an event sponsored annually by The Fellowship. I found his words typical of the "poster child," Horatio Alger, poor child makes it big mythology of our nation. While I applaud Dr Carson's exceptional success, to draw the conclusion from it that 1) he did it all on his own, etc and 2) so can/should everyone else if they just try. Just not that simple. Having said that, the stage that morning was dominated by two men who grasp opportunity provided by the American community: public schools, PELL grants, public benefits. Both came from single parent families. Both project hope, which is much needed.

Beyond this, I just don't agree with Dr Carson's political worldview in general. His diatribe vs political correctness didn't make much sense to me. He didn't really lay out much on healthcare reform, likely due to the fact that he is conflicted out by concerns for his own wealth (See this week's TIME mag).

That's my short take. I'd be happy to answer questions. I don't mind debating his ideas at all. Frankly, he sounds Libertarian to me.

Anonymous said...

The Horato Alger "myth " is not a myth at all. It happens to be true for a large percentage of the people I know.