Sunday, May 11, 2008

If you are in or near Austin, Texas next Tuesday. . .




If you are going to be in or near Austin, Texas next Tuesday, May 13 at 5:00 p.m., you ought to head to the Capitol building to take part in a rally to be led by Jim Wallis, best-selling author and editor of Sojourners magazine.

To learn more, simply click on my title line above and read the story in yesterday's Austin paper.

If you attend, I'd love to hear from you with a report on your reactions.

Wallis has a new book out: The Great Awakening: Reviving Faith & Politics in a Post-Religious Right America. You can order a copy by going to Amazon.com via the link on this page.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is the foreward by the same Jimmy Carter that never met a dictator he didn't like?

Anonymous said...

The Reverend Jim Wallis is a liberal, evangelical Christian writer and political activist, best known as the founder and editor of Sojourners magazine and of the Washington, D.C.-based Christian community of the same name.

Wallis actively eschews political labels, but his advocacy tends to focus on issues of peace and social justice, earning him his primary support from the religious left. Wallis is also known for his opposition to the religious right's fiscal and foreign policies.

This is great! More Liberation Theology. Sooner or later, the "Christian" can be dropped altogether, after the Trojan horse is emptied of its contents.

Anonymous said...

I learned nothing from the previous two comments. But it did reinforce the idea that some people are closed-minded to dialog from the other side.

Thanks for promoting dialog and making people think about the issues, Larry. Sadly, some don't get it. And they'll continue to make negative comments about Carter, Wallis, or anyone else.

Larry James said...

Thanks, Anon 6:56 PM. I have to tell you that when espousing peace, negotiation as a first response, justice and fairness, concern for the poor, etc. means we must take "Christian" out of our name or title it makes me wonder what kind of "Christians" are making such comments and what Bible they are reading. It is baffling to say the least. Frankly, people who defend war, economic oppression as a matter of policy and rigidity as the basis for a foreign policy don't seem to be anywhere near the spirit of the Jesus I know and attempt very imperfectly to follow. I'll keep talking, but I know some just don't care to really hear.

It would also be good if all of the Anons would just tell us their real names.

Anonymous said...

Yes, just imagine: concern for the poor, praise for peacemakers, inclusion for the outcasts and forgotten of society! Who would espouse such ridiculous nonsense?!

Oh, wait, that's right ...

Anonymous said...

Yea, what is so ironic is the fact that Jim Wallis is one of the most biblical preachers I've ever heard. He is coming straight out of the text of the Bible and out of a heart that is devoted to that worldview. Too many American Evangelicals are more devoted to capitalism, profit and personal freedom in a very secular way than to the challenging message of Jesus.

Jon Cortez

Anonymous said...

Jon Cortez:

I am devoted to capitalism, profit and personal freedom. How do you think that in less than 300 years we have the most advanced, innovative and most powerful force for good in the history of civilization? May I remind you if you lived in a country without personal freedom you wouldn't know what the message of Jesus was.

Daniel Gray said...

I'll take the Roman Empire's persecuted Christians over just about any "Christian" society today. Those early Christians understood the call of Jesus -- living radically and caring for those in need.

Our "free" society has lead to complacent, lukewarm Christianity. Freedom is great -- it means I don't have to do anything. But if we want a more vibrant, meaningful church, then history has shown that persecution is the way to go.

Charles said...

Still-Anonymous 10:49PM:

I guess you don't believe in the freedom so you're protecting your identity. Was Rome a free country? Or most of the European countries that Christianity persisted through for over 1500 years? Are China or Russia or many African countries where the gospel is spreading free?

I'm glad we live in a relatively free society and a country with a good (once again, relative to almost any other) historical track record on taking care of itself and others. But the Gospel's way too powerful for any mere government to stop.

Enjoy America, but Christianity only owes thanks and praise to one Lord.

Anonymous said...

I believe in capitalism and profit and personal freedom. I believe in them because they have a track record of working, that is, of producing the greatest "return on investment," the greatest amount of goods for the work performed. I would hesitate to say I am "devoted" to any of these good ideas. "Devotion" is closely akin to discipleship. I try to limit that status (devotion/disciple) to one God at a time. And if capitalism or profit conflict with God's call to help others, I'll have to go with God's call.

Anon 10:49's candid comment explains a lot, and I suspect it's shared my several frequent commentators on this blog.

Anonymous said...

Anon 11:06, pretty sure you are 10:49 as well. It's easy to post multiple anon comments to make it look like it's multiple people.

I'm glad you believe in those things. I believe in the words of Jesus -- He's the greatest return on investment.

Anonymous said...

I used the word "devoted" because anon. 8:11 used it.

Anonymous said...

Anon 1:02:

You are mistaken. Anon 10:49 and 11:06 are not the same. Creepy thought, though, having a blog conversation with yourself. Maybe I'll try it sometime.

Anon 10:49: Unattributed use of the language of others is really an adoption of that language, is it not? Freudian slip, perhaps?